Yarn-along: January 25, 2012

Happy feast of the Conversion of St. Paul!

Around here, we’re just getting over the horrendous flu/cold that had us down for at least 7 days each — which is never a pretty sight when there are 5 folks in the house. Dh never stopped going in to work, so I think that’s why he’s had the dreaded disease the longest. Me? I took to resting and pampering myself right away and so never did get it as bad — which is important cuz the kids look to me to Florence Nightingale it when they have contracted the “WORST disease ever, Mom”.

One of the great things about homeschooling is that, even tho the kids are “under the weather”, we can still get in some school while resting and taking it easy. We’re currently reading our way thru apologetics with the amazing book A Philadelphia Catholic in King James’ Court — I’d be hard-pressed to find a better apologetics book for middle-schoolers AND the kids like the story-line. I also use the study guide to help generate discussions on the chapter just read … altho generating discussions around here is never very difficult.

We’ve started a new read-aloud that is shaping up to be a fun read: The Billionaire’s Curse is a mystery and all are enjoying listening to the marvelous writing of Richard Newsome.

On my reading table is a wonderful non-diet, diet book: Why We Get Fat and What To Do About It. Gary Taubes, author of Good Calories, Bad Calories, refutes the classic notion that people get fat because they’re gluttonous and lazy. Instead, Taubes shows that it’s the carbs we eat — especially prevalent in sweets and breads, but also present in most fruit (which is now grown to be super sweet), whole-grain products and others of the “good” foods. In other words, unless you curb your carb intake and increase your protein and fat intake, you won’t lose weight. His book is not a diet book — altho he does link to some excellent diets — but rather a treatise on eating right, eating what will satisfy while helping to get the weight off. And I have friends who have read this book and it does really work for long-term sustained weight loss and better health.

And, because I always have to have a knitting book on my table, I am also poring thru Robin Hansen’s latest: Ultimate Mitten Book. Mittens are fun to knit — small, take-anywhere-projects while also being practical and a great way to practice new techniques or play with color-work — and Hansen does a stellar job of showing many (28) different ways to cover your hands in the cold. The book is hard-cover with sturdy, non-glossy pages that make it a delight to read and work from. The illustrations are clear and detailed while the writing itself is enjoyable. Definitely a keeper!

Kai and Koal: Ninja Brothers


Since we’re talking about knitting, I did get some done even while “oh, so sick”: I finished up the two, super secret submissions and those have been sent off (and a week before deadline, which always make me happy). As soon as I know anything, I’ll let y’all know! I also was able to design/knit the boys ninjas. Kai and Koal are the result (here’s a link to the pattern on Ravelry). The pattern is for all-in-one-piece construction, making these soft cuddly toys also sturdy (the boys have already put the ninjas thru intense battles to prove it). It’s a fun design.

On my knitting needles is a capelet, Spring Flower Garden, I’m doing using Tofutsies … my new go-to yarn for socks and other garments due to it’s hand (or feel) and it’s lovely stitch definition. This will be a self-published pattern … so as soon as I have it done, blocked and written up … I’ll post it.

What do you have on your needles and on your reading table? Want to come play with us over at Ginny’s?

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